Groceries Tracker DOWN for the first time in 2018

Basket of goods falls for the first time in 2018

Every month mySupermarket produce a Groceries Tracker report looking at the average monthly cost of a basket of goods to see if groceries are costing shoppers more. This release powers news stories across the world. You can be on the mailing list to find out what is happening with the cost of goods first with the full release by emailing Press@mySupermarket.com

The price of the average basket of grocery items has fallen for the first time in 2018 according to mySupermarket’s monthly Groceries Tracker. Shoppers paid less for the same basket of goods in April 2018 compared to March 2018.

mySupermarket.co.uk found the price of a basket of 35 popular items has fallen for the first time since December 2017, coming to £85.99 in April compared to the previous month’s £86.78  but shoppers are still paying £3.25 (4%) more for the same basket of goods compared to April 2017.

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Family favourites bananas have seen a 2% price increase per 8 bananas, potentially due to shortages caused by diseased crops earlier this year. Milk has also seen a price increase of 2%. Pasta and cola have each risen 3%. The highest riser however has been broccoli which cost 19% more in April 2018 vs March and 36% more than April 2017.  This is likely due to a risk of supply shortages caused by Britain’s unusual spring weather. The price may rise further still if the product has to be imported.

It’s good news for fresh food fans however as the top five price reductions are all in the fresh aisle.

Mushrooms have seen the biggest price reduction of 29% between March and April 2018. They are also 2% cheaper per 300g compared to April 2017. The cost of onions per kg has also noticeably fallen 9%. Carrots have fallen 6% between the two months. Tomatoes have fallen 4% per 500g to in April 2018 but are 5% more expensive in April 2018 compared to April 2017 however.

Compared to April 2017, shoppers are paying 4%, or £3.25, more. This is higher than the usual 3% year on year increase, but not as high as previous months — suggesting the trend of rising basket price is slowing. Again like March, squash drink (25%) and kitchen towel (25%) are more expensive in 2018 possibly because of the introduction of the UK sugar tax in the case of sqash and production issues worldwide for kitchen towel.

mySupermarket’s CEO Gilad Simhony said:

gilad_ceoObviously we’re delighted to report a fall in the cost of an average basket of goods: even if it is only 1%, it is the right direction! We’re also pleased to see that most of April’s price reductions benefit healthy lifestyles.  

It is also interesting to see that both cola and squash drinks are more expensive (20% and 25% respectively) in April 2018 compared to the same period of 2017. This suggests the introduction of the UK sugar tax in April is pushing category prices up. This is a trend we’ll watch closely in the coming months but shoppers can still save despite rising category costs by comparing their shop between stores and even within the same shop using mySupermarket.

To be added to the mySupermarket Groceries Tracker distribution list for the full report first, please email press@mysupermarket.com

Notes on the data:
In order to improve the accuracy of the mySupermarket Groceries Tracker, prices from September 2017 will no longer include Aldi. This change has also been applied to previous reports to ensure fair comparison between September 2017 and the months prior.
The mySupermarket Groceries Tracker is an industry first covering nearly 5,000 products across the supermarkets: Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury’s, Ocado, Waitrose, Lidl and Morrisons. All prices include offers but do not include multibuy. Prices are an average and cover the whole of the stated month. The prices given include brand and own brand and are for value and regular ranges only. They do not include finest/luxury ranges which are not available at all supermarkets. To represent a ‘normal’ weekly shop, certain products were taken out as these disproportionately inflate prices (examples include items that are organic, free range, Fairtrade, gluten free etc.)